News: Berlin marathon

Press Release

BMW BERLIN-MARATHON: Eliud Kipchoge runs World Record in Berlin, Tigist Assefa sets sensational Course Record

27 Sep, 2022 (Tue)

Eliud Kipchoge crowned the 48th edition of the BMW BERLIN-MARATHON in breaking the world record with his time of 2:01:09. The 37-year-old improved his own world best time by exactly half a minute. He was even on course for a while to achieve the dream of running under two hours but couldn’t maintain this splendid pace. The Kenyan added further lustre to Berlin’s already rich honour board since this was the 12th world record in the marathon’s history, a total unmatched by any other marathon race in the world. Eliud Kipchoge’s fellow Kenyan finished second in 2:05:58 and the Ethiopian Tadu Abate took third place with 2:06:28. The leading German runner was Haftom Weldaj who finished a highly creditable 11th, improving his best to 2:09:06, the best performance by a German marathoner this year. A newcomer to Berlin found sensational form to break the women’s course record. Tigist Assefa of Ethiopia went to the start line with a personal best of 2:34:01 which didn’t suggest she would be a contender for honours. She confounded expectations, however, to win in 2:15:37, taking full advantage of ideal weather conditions. The 26-year-old ran the third fastest marathon by a woman in history as well as an Ethiopian national record and a world best for the year. Assefa carved a huge slice off the previous record of 2:18:11, set by the Kenyan Gladys Cherono in 2018. These performances by both champions helped make the BMW BERLIN-MARATHON the highest quality marathon in history. The combined times of the results for Kipchoge and Assefa came to 4:16:46. This year’s Tokyo marathon previously occupied the top spot with an aggregate winners’ time of 4:18:42. Further statistics reflected the impact of the 48th edition of the BMW BERLIN-MARATHON, one of the races in the Abbott World Marathon Majors Series, with 45,527 entries from 157 countries. “The crowning glory of today were the 12th world record in our history and then such a strong performance to break the women’s course record. We had planned for Eliud to break the record but I hadn’t expected Tigist to run a time like that,” said the Race Director Mark Milde. “It was also great to see people coming out on the street to cheer the runners.” Men’s Race Weather conditions were outstanding for distance running with temperatures hovering between 12 and 15 degrees Centigrade, mostly clouded skies and barely a breath of wind with humidity between 85 and 75 per cent. From the start, Eliud Kipchoge seemed intent on attacking the two-hour barrier, joined by two Ethiopians in his incredible tempo, Guye Adola, last year’s winner, and Andamlak Belihu. It was a surprise to see the latter go with this kind of pace, since his best time previously was 2:09:43. By 15 kilometres Adola dropped back and subsequently dropped out at 35km. The pace also proved too much for Belihu as he lost contact at 25km but bravely hung on to cross the finish line near the Brandenburg Gate in a personal best of 2:06:40 for fourth place. For a long time Eliud Kipchoge was on course for a time under two hours. He went through halfway in an astonishing 59:51, keeping right on track for a sub-two clocking. He had done this already, running 1:59:40.2 in Vienna in 2019 but the event did not conform to regulations for record-breaking. But from 25 kilometres the Kenyan was running solo after the last pacemaker dropped out and his pace slowed, by his extraordinary standards. As the prospect of breaking two hours faded, so did his chances of breaking 2:01. Earlier Eliud Kipchoge had gone through 25km and 30km in 1:11:08 and 1:25:39 respectively. No official world records are recognised for these distances by World Athletics, the world governing body for track and field, but these are the fastest times ever recorded. Although he was slowing down, it was only by his incredible yardstick and he still smashed the world record with 2:01:09. “I’m overjoyed to break the world record in Berlin. I wanted to run the first half fast,” said Eliud Kipchoge. “I felt good during the race, I was very relaxed,” added the double Olympic champion. Kipchoge has now won the BMW BERLIN-MARATHON four times, beginning in 2015, then 2017 and the following year before this latest triumph. The achievement draws him level with another all-time great, Haile Gebrselasssie, for the number of record Berlin victories. For good measure, the Kenyan also made more or less sure of winning the Abbott World Marathon Majors Series for 2022 with this triumph. Women’s Race The women’s race turned unexpectedly into one of the highest quality marathons in history. After a group of five went through halfway in 68:13, the pace rose still further. By 30 kilometres the Ethiopians Tigist Assefa, Tigist Abayechew and Sisay Meseret Gola were timed at 1:36:41, on course for a finishing time of 2:16:30. From there Tigist Assefa, who had concentrated on track races for the first part of her career but now discovered that the marathon was really her best event, broke free to win in 2:15:37. It was only her second marathon but took her to third on the world all-time list, only the world record holder Brigid Kosgei of Kenya with 2:14:04 and Britain’s Paula Radcliffe with 2:15:25 have run faster. “I’m overjoyed at this win,” said Tigist Assefa. “I wasn’t afraid of my rivals, even though they had faster best times than me. This is only my second marathon and I hope to run even faster at the next one,” said Tigist Assefa. The pre-race favourite and American record holder Keira D’Amato finished in sixth in 2:21:48 but a debutant, Rosemary Wanjiru, burst onto the world stage at a stroke. The Kenyan ran 2:18:00, the second fastest debut of all time. The Ethiopian Tigist Abayechew finished third in 2:18:03. These results placed the runner-up and third finisher as the 15th and 16th fastest women in history. The high quality results continued with Worknesh Edesa of Ethiopia taking fourth place in 2:18:51, another to break 2:20. Four women breaking 2:19 in a marathon has been achieved only once previously and that was in Tokyo in February. Results, Men: 1. Eliud Kipchoge KEN 2:01:09 2. Mark Korir KEN 2:05:58 3. Tadu Abate ETH 2:06:28 4. Andamlak Belihu ETH 2:06:40 5. Abel Kipchumba KEN 2:06:49 6. Limenih Getachew ETH 2:07:07 7. Kenya Sonota JPN 2:07:14 8. Tatsuya Maruyama JPN 2:07:50 9. Kento Kikutani JPN 2:07:56 10. Zablon Chumba KEN 2:08:01 11. Haftom Weldaj GER/ERI 2:09:06 Women: 1. Tigist Assefa ETH 2:15:37 2. Rosemary Wanjiru KEN 2:18:00 3. Tigist Abayechew ETH 2:18:03 4. Workenesh Edesa ETH 2:18:51 5. Sisay Meseret Gola ETH 2:20:58 6. Keira D’Amato USA 2:21:48 7. Rika Kaseda JPN 2:21:55 8. Ayuko Suzuki JPN 2:22:02 9. Sayaka Sato JPN 2:22:13 10. Vibian Chepkirui KEN 2:22:21
Ahotu event page:
5 min read
Press Release

World record race at the BMW BERLIN-MARATHON

26 Sep, 2022 (Mon)

Eliud Kipchoge crowned the 48th edition of the BMW BERLIN MARATHON with an incredible world record of 2:01:09 hours. The 37-year-old Kenyan thus improved his own best time by exactly half a minute – unbelievable. Tigist Assefa ran a sensational course record. Starting as an outsider with a personal best of 2:34:01 before, the Ethiopian ran the race of her life in excellent weather conditions and won in 2:15:37 hours.
Ahotu event page:
1 min read
Press Release

BMW BERLIN-MARATHON: The Flame of Ambition still burns brightly for Kenenisa Bekele

28 Sep, 2021 (Tue)

24 hours after he had stood on the startline of the BMW BERLIN-MARATHON, Kenenisa Bekele reflected on the dramatic events of Sunday’s race where he trailed in third with a time of 2:06:47, albeit set in hot and humid conditions. After pre-race talk of high hopes for an attack on Eliud Kipchoge’s world record of 2:01:39, set on this same Berlin course in 2018, the Ethiopian’s career appeared to be in the balance and not for the first time given his age and injury record. But at 39 he is adamant that his potential for future success is realistic. Right after the race Kenenisa Bekele admitted that “for me the big problem was a lack of training because of the pandemic”. The Ethiopian also said that he caught Covid earlier this year. But he had no strong symptoms and recovered well. His first stop after Berlin will be to visit the home base of his management team in the Netherlands, reviewing the future and, equally important, having a full physical check on the body which has helped him win three Olympic titles on the track but also suffered more than its share of injuries in a top-flight career going back more than 20 years. Prior to the race in Berlin, his manager Jos Hermens had been quoted as saying that he believed Kenenisa had the talent to run at high standard beyond the age of 40. Kenenisa himself made that point in a pre-race press conference in Berlin, commenting that new shoe technology played its part in easing the training load, allowing his body to recover faster. Here is Kenenisa’s own view of his future capability even after Sunday’s disappointment: “I have information from other athletes that, even at this age, 40, many athletes can achieve good results, you are not too old for the marathon at that age.” He would welcome a return to Berlin and the course which has been the stage for eleven world records to date, an unprecedented record for marathons worldwide: “If I’m healthy and prepared, I’d like to run again in Berlin for the world record.” On the subject of “Ifs” and the future, he also spoke in Berlin on Monday morning about the possibility of competing at the 2024 Olympics in Paris. He gave a wry smile when the selection policy for the Ethiopian Olympic Marathon team was mentioned. So far, Kenenisa Bekele has yet to be selected for an Olympic marathon team by his country, albeit he currently holds the second fastest time in history, 2:01:41, set here in Berlin two years ago. He remains hopeful, however: “Of course, for sure I want to be part of it [Olympic Marathon in 2024 in Paris] but it’s difficult to decide according to the Ethiopian Federation. I have only one country, there is no choice, even if I want to go to Paris, I don’t know their criteria again so it’s going to be difficult.” The marathon can be a tough teacher, demanding on body and soul foe the most gifted as well the thousands who followed Kenenisa Bekele across the finish line on a hot and humid Sunday in Berlin. Yet it seems that the great Ethiopian is ready and willing to apply himself once more to its study. More information is available online at: www.berlin-marathon.com
Ahotu event page:
2 min read
Press Release

BMW BERLIN-MARATHON: Guye Adola scores unexpected triumph in Berlin, debutant Gotytom Gebreslase surprises to win women's title

28 Sep, 2021 (Tue)

No doubt about who carried off the top honours in the BMW Berlin-Marathon on Sunday since Ethiopians won the men’s and women’s title. It was, however, a day of disappointment for Kenenisa Bekele by his own superlative standards. Guye Adola won the men’s crown, running 2:05:45 to finish ahead of Kenyan Bethwel Yegon, the latter clocking 2:06:14 at the finish line near the Brandenburg Gate. As for Kenenisa Bekele, his hopes of challenging the world record, set on this same course by his Kenyan rival Eliud Kipchoge in 2018 with 2:01:39, faded in increasingly warm and humid conditions. Ethiopia’s triple Olympic champion finished third in 2:06:47. The best German finisher was Philipp Pflieger who ran 2:15:01 for 16th place. With temperatures above 20 degrees Celsius during the latter stages of the race, any hopes for record times faded. The race was rarely short of incident, however. In the women’s field, Gotytom Gebreslase ran a superb debut marathon. The 26 year-old Ethiopian surprised the favourites and ran the third fastest time of the year with 2:20:09. Her compatriot Hiwot Gebrekidan took second in 2:21:23 and Helen Tola completed an Ethiopian podium with 2:23:05. Germany’s Rabea Schöneborn finished ninth with 2:28:49. The 47th edition of the BMW BERLIN-MARATHON, which is part of the Abbott World Marathon Majors Series, took place under strict hygiene regulations. With 24,796 runners from 139 nations the race was the biggest marathon in the world since the start of the Corona pandemic. “After months of deprivation and social distancing, SCC Events set a decisive milestone with the BMW BERLIN-MARATHON. At the world’s largest marathon since the beginning of the Coronavirus pandemic, people are beginning to find a new sense of trust through sport and are beginning to feel safe again. Basic values of openness to the world, tolerance and acceptance, which we championed for many years, can finally be lived again. On the way back to normality, society needs precisely these emotions,” said Jürgen Lock, the general manager of organizer SCC Events. Men’s Race The lead group with pacemakers went through the first half of the race at world record pace. It was no surprise to see Kenenisa Bekele and Guye Adola among them, the latter having finished second in Berlin four years ago and set what was then an unofficial world record for a marathon debut of 2:03:36, but their four companions were less well known: the Kenyan duo of Philemon Kacheran and Abraham Kipyatich and the Ethiopians Tesfaye Lencho and Olika Adugna. The group went through 10km in 28:47, a pace which pointed to a world record time of just under 2:01:30. Olika Adugna was the first to drop off the fast pace but the big surprise came when Kenenisa Bekele was the next to feel the pressure. The 2019 champion lost contact with the lead group between 17 and 18 kilometres as they went through halfway in world record tempo of 60:48 with Bekele timed at 61:00, still a very fast time. His chance of at least victory appeared to have revived by 27 kilometres since the triple Olympic champion was back in front after the group had slowed dramatically. It was all about competition now rather than the world record since times for some of the individual kilometres were over three minutes. Guye Adola went clear of Bekele shortly before 35 kilometres and appeared to have victory sealed. But there were still more unexpected events to come as Bethwel Yegon emerged to challenge the leader, having made a remarkable move through the field. They were together till just before 40 kilometres when Adola, runner-up to Eliud Kipchoge when the great Kenyan won here four years ago, found fresh energy and broke free en route to the biggest win of his career to date. "I believed I had a chance of beating Kenenisa going into the race. It was very warm and my feet were burning in my shoes,” said Guye Adola. Kenenisa Bekele explained that: "The big problem was lack of training because of the pandemic. I missed out on some training sessions. But my career is definitely not over.” On a tough day for elite and mass runners alike because of rising temperatures and humidity, Philipp Pflieger struggled as well. The German had to dig deep when his original target of 2:12 faded from view after a promising first half of 65:55. “I ran the last 17 kilometres alone and for the last five it was just a case of survival till the finish line,” reflected Pflieger. Women’s Race For long parts of the race the women’s leading group was on a pace for a sub 2:19 finish. A group of four reached half way in a promising 69:19. World leader Hiwot Gebrekidan, who ran 2:19:35 in spring, Helen Tola, debutant Gotytom Gebreslase and Kenya’s Fancy Chemutai formed the first group behind the pacemakers at this stage. With around 10k to go it was Gotytom Gebreslase who increased the pace and moved ahead of pre-race favourite Hiwot Gebrekidan. She was still going very fast at 35k with a split time of 1:54:54 which pointed to a 2:18:30 finishing time. However on the final kilometres the warm temperatures took its toll. Gotytom Gebreslase was not able to keep the pace and in the end she missed a sub 2:20 time by just ten seconds. “Although it was my first marathon it was my aim to win the race. Berlin has a great course and I would like to come back for this race,” said Gotytom Gebreslase. Germany’s Rabea Schöneborn struggled in the warm conditions as well. After a first half of 73:56 she was not able to produce a negative split and attack her personal best of 2:27:03. “It was tough with the warm temperatures and I am not happy with my time. But it was a great experience,” said Rabea Schöneborn, who ran the marathon in her hometown for the first time. Results Men: 1. Guye Adola ETH 2:05:45 2. Bethwel Yegon KEN 2:06:14 3. Kenensia Bekele ETH 2:06:47 4. Tadu Abate ETH 2:08:24 5. Cosmas Muteti KEN 2:08:45 6. Philemon Kacheran KEN 2:09:29 7. Okbay Tsegay ERI 2:10:37 8. Benard Kimeli KEN 2:10:50 9. Hidekazu Hijikata JPN 2:11:47 10. Hosea Kipkemboi KEN 2:12:25 Women: 1. Gotytom Gebreslase ETH 2:20:09 2. Hiwot Gebrekidan ETH 2:21:23 3. Helen Tola ETH 2:23:05 4. Edith Chelimo KEN 2:24:33 5. Shure Demise ETH 2:24:43 6. Fancy Chemutai KEN 2:24:58 7. Izabela Paszkiewicz POL 2:27:41 8. Ruth Chebitok KEN 2:28:18 9. Rabea Schöneborn GER 2:28:49 10. Martina Strähl SUI 2:30:37 More information is available online at: www.berlin-marathon.com
Ahotu event page:
5 min read
NewsResults

Results 2021: Berlin Marathon

27 Sep, 2021 (Mon)

Credit : IronmanTriathlonMarathon Adola, Guye (eth) outran roughly 23097 runners to win with a time of 02:05:45. Yegon, Bethwel (ken) earned runner-up honours with a time of 02:06:14. Rounding out the top three was Bekele, Kenenisa (eth) with a time of 02:06:47. In the ladies race, it was Gebreslase, Gotytom (eth) (02:20:09) taking the top spot, ahead of Gebrekidan, Hiwot (eth) (02:21:23). Tola, Helen (eth) got the third place in 02:23:05. Top 5 Men 1 Adola, Guye (eth) 02:05:45 2 Yegon, Bethwel (ken) 02:06:14 3 Bekele, Kenenisa (eth) 02:06:47 4 Abate, Tadu (eth) 02:08:24 5 Muteti, Cosmas (ken) 02:08:45 Top 5 Women 1 Gebreslase, Gotytom (eth) 02:20:09 2 Gebrekidan, Hiwot (eth) 02:21:23 3 Tola, Helen (eth) 02:23:05 4 Chelimo, Edith (ken) 02:24:33 5 Demise, Shure (eth) 02:24:43 Complete results
Ahotu event page:
1 min read